Remembering The Ultimate Warrior

Remembering The Ultimate Warrior

The Ultimate Warrior passed away several years ago. However, his word and ideas live on. He was Jim Helwig…a wrestling hero to children, but an inspiration to adults. He taught us the importance of ruthless aggression. He encouraged us to kick ass, live our dreams, and to demand more from life.

The passion in his voice, the determination in his eyes, the raw energy. That’s what dwells in the house of greatness. May the Ultimate Warrior live forever! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taF5ikZp_ms

His quotes are for those who dream large:

Shake the ropes, baby…and do it every day.

warrior

Learn to Limit Your Conversations

Learn to Limit Your Conversations

When you speak to your child, do you talks about politics? Do you talk about relationships? French films? Of course you don’t. You talk about things you both understand: cartoons, food, etc.

Do the same thing with adults. Talk about the common ground you share with them—the topics you both understand. Maybe it’s philosophy, maybe sports. You have at least one thing in common with the majority of humanity.

We become frustrated when we force conversations. We speak about things that are not relevant to the audience. We want them to experience the movie theatre of our minds. There’s only one problem—most of them don’t care. They’re living in their own movie theatre.

Yeah…but Major. I need to talk about political theory! I need to talk about the illuminati! Well, you can…just like you can do anything in life. But you’ll be frustrated. You’ll find yourself alone, even when you’re in a crowd.

Learn to limit your conversations. The more you do this, the happier you’ll be.

You’re Always Doing Algebra

You’re Always Doing Algebra

Algebra is, quite simply, a game of “find the missing” number. What does X mean? What does Y mean? What number do you need to solve a problem?

Let me present three ways that you do algebra as an adult:

  • A spouse you’re trying to meet
  • A diet you’re trying to implement
  • A financial strategy you’re learning about

You’re always looking for a missing number, for something to complete your life. You’re always searching…always looking. Always waiting for dessert, hoping for a cherry to top your cake.

You’re always doing algebra.

Photos of Dallas: Then and Now

Photos of Dallas: Then and Now

Here’s a photo of Dallas on the day JFK was shot dead (November 22nd, 1963):

jfk-photo

We see five young women in the front. They’re all skinny, dressed formally, and have a pleasant demeanor.

Fast forward 54 years…and here’s a photo of in Dallas in 2017:

fat_people

Sad! Texas was a great land. From its noble loins came the representatives of genius: Dwight Eisenhower, Robert Dennard, Jerry Jones, etc. The seeds of American greatness could be found in the lands of the lone state. And now, by 2030, 6 out of every 10 Texans will be overweight. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

Never forget…the honorable person can be defiled. The virtuous can be soiled. The man of greatness, sucked into the vortex of evil. Always stay vigilant, my friends. Always keep your eyes peeled, looking for the potholes of disaster. Always sat awake…aware…battling the forces of darkness.

#Pray4Texas

 

 

 

Essay Review: “The Turning Point of My Life” by Mark Twain

Essay Review: “The Turning Point of My Life” by Mark Twain

What is Man? is the last book that Mark Twain wrote. In my opinion, it’s the best thing he ever composed. It’s a collection of short stories and essays. The topics are broad, covering everything from the death of his wife Jean to the virtues of tobacco. On some level, it’s a Mark Twain blog – the man in all his greatness, touching on a variety of topics.

My favorite essay from the book is “The Turning-Point of My Life.” Twain recalls his early days, reflecting on the defining moments of his childhood. He describes the “turning point” as a moment when a measles epidemic was ravaging his hometown. Everybody was living in fear, everybody petrified. The children were dying. People were locked inside their homes, frightened. The fear was palatable.

Twain stayed in the house for months. Eventually, he couldn’t take it anymore and decided to leave the house, risking death.

In short, he decided that is was better to live with bravery than die with fear.

Life on these miserable terms was not worth living…This was a turning-point of my life.

Twain catches the measles and becomes ill…but he survives. From that point forth, he learns a valuable lesson. You can’t live in fear. You can’t always worry about what might happen. You can’t go through life petrified. You need to live…and live with courage. You need to stand up to danger.

The greatest rewards come when you take chances. When you decide to chase your unconventional dreams. When you decide to go against the grain, doing something that nobody else has the courage to do. When you realize that your own path is different and that you must go against the common plan. When you decide to be you.

You can find a link to the book here. I highly recommend adding it to your reading list – you won’t regret it:http://pinkmonkey.com/dl/library1/digi036.pdf

 

3 Ways to Connect with People

3 Ways to Connect with People

Here are the three ways to connect with people—from worst to best:

3.) You Hate the Same Things

This is great during political season. You connect with people that you normally have nothing in common with. You might share a beer or coffee together, musing on the problems in the world. And you find out that you both hate Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, Fidel Castro, etc. When you leave, you’ll have a renewed faith in humanity—you saw something in this person that was previously hidden to you. Now “they cool.”

But this is a weak connection. As the old saying goes, “Politics make strange bedfellows.” When the gestalt of the moment is gone, you’ll find yourself in the same place with this person—a relative stranger.

Be careful that you don’t overrate this type of connection.

2.) You Like the Same Things

Some people confuse this for love. You like baseball, she likes baseball. You like country music, she likes country music. You like sex, she likes sex. And on and on. These type of relationships become more common as we grow older, because our sphere of contact becomes smaller. We go fewer places. So people will “hook up” with one another at a place they both frequent, such as the gym – it’s mating through proximity.

This connection is ultimately flawed. Once the baseball game is over, or the concert lights have died down, then the ugly truth is revealed. And you’ll often find yourself at odds with this person. Their real nature is revealed, and you don’t like what you see – they turn out to be a liar, a thief, or a stubborn malcontent. What happened? Well, you were duped by the enjoyment of the moment, by the music of the evening. Your connection was momentary, influenced by external forces. The connection was missing an intrinsic glue at the fundamental level.

Be careful that you don’t overrate this type of connection.

1.) You Share the Same Values

This is the best connection; you both share a Weltanschauung on the world. Your understanding of integrity, respect and honor are similar. You operate from the fundamental framework of ideals, on what is best in principle. You both share similar understanding of the world.

Note that your values don’t need to be good—for every Bonnie, there’s a Clyde. For every Hitler, there’s an Eva Braun. There’s somebody out there for everyone. So you merely have to agree with the other person on a fundamental level. The hardware of your computers should be equal. The motors created in a similar factory.

This is the best type of connection – one that’s based on values.

Are You a Prisoner of the Mind?

Are You a Prisoner of the Mind?

Imagine you were in prison for 10 years. During that time, 10 songs played over and over. The music was horrible—angry vocals with lyrics about a violent world. You hate the songs at first. But then, for your own sanity, you learn how to process them—you learn how to accept the music as part of your consciousness.

older-man-in-jail-cell-aggravated-assault
Imagine who were in prison for ten years, listening to the same ten songs.

But then one day….you escape! You break out of prison, run to the shoreline, and steal a boat. You spend hours rowing on the open sea. Eventually, you come to a deserted island. It’s beautiful place, filled with clean water and tropical fruit. You kiss the ground and cry. Thank God you’re out of prison! Thank God you’re free!

alone
Then  you escape prison, landing on a deserted island. You’re free at last!!!

Do you know what happens now? Do you know what happens now that you’re “free”?

You think about the songs that you heard in prison – you’re still a prisoner.

Prison is psychological, not just physical—it lives in your your mind as well. This point was elaborated on brilliantly in Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky. The main character commits a double murder and he’s never caught—but he’s emotionally tortured by the guilt. The point is clear enough—he’s already in prison. He’s already serving a punishment.

 

prison-of-the-mind
You’re still in prison, even though you’re free.

What agitating”songs” are currently being played in your prison?

First solution: eliminate those songs. These “songs” could be people you’re surrounded by, television shows you’re watching, etc. Some tough decisions will have to be made. You might have to distance yourself from people you otherwise love – even family. But your personal happiness comes first. You can’t make somebody else happy if you’re miserable.

Second solution: teach yourself to think again. Read great books, hit the gym, only watch selective programming on television. Remember that ideas are the food of the mind. Garbage in, garbage out. So you’ll have to teach yourself to “eat healthy” thoughts. Like all changes, it won’t be easy. But it must be done.

Freedom is a mental state, as well as a physical one.